The Ephesus Collection

The Ephesus Collection

In Classic, Traditional, Vintage by Ashley BLeave a Comment

Situated on the western Turkish coast lies the port city of Selçuk, site of the ancient city of Ephesus. Established in the 10th century BCE, Ephesus boasts a diverse history colored by contributions from Classical Greece, the Roman Empire, mythology, and religion. Goth raids and earthquakes damaged the once-bustling center of commerce under Greco-Roman rule, and Ephesus is now home to the beloved relics, ruins, and remnants of traditions celebrated by various cultures over the past 12,000 years.

Ephesus’ rich history has inspired a collection of exceptional silk hand-knotted rugs, interweaving antiquity and intricate beauty in an artful take on the city and its culture. The collection includes six pieces crafted by artisans and steeped in tradition. Each rug has been meticulously designed to reflect historical Ephesian landmarks, effectively passing ancient customs down to future generations through keepsake tapestries. Continue reading to discover the distinctive features of each work of art.

  • Connector.

    Library of Celsus

    Library of Celsus depicts the Roman library completed in 135 CE honoring Tiberius Julius Celsus Polemaeanus.

  • Connector.

    Saint John

    Saint John depicts artifacts relative to John the Apostle, including Saint John’s Basilica, commissioned by Justinian I in the 6th century CE. The basilica rests atop what is believed to be John the Apostle’s burial site.

  • Connector.

    Virgin Mary

    Virgin Mary depicts the Virgin Mary along with female goddesses Kybele, Kubaba, and Artemis. The House of the Virgin Mary, a Catholic and Muslim shrine, is where Mary is believed to have died.

  • Connector.

    Temple of Artemis

    The Temple of Artemis depicts the Statue of Artemis at Ephesus, the revered Greek and Anatolian goddess, and the temple’s ruins. The Temple of Artemis is one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.

  • Connector.

    Arcadian Way

    Arcadian Way depicts one of the oldest surviving streets of antiquity, named after Arcadius in 383-403 CE. It was a grand street once flanked by shops, galleries, and columns. It was one of three streets to boast street lamps at the time.


View Library of Celsus in our Collection

Leave a Comment